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The reason we listen to music

zaneatkin

Since I was a kid I have been listening to music. My mom was a musician my brother , my uncle was a brilliant musician and for some reason i could never really grasp the idea of reading and playing music. That’s not to say i didn’t  love it. I love everything about music  but I could never  do it. All of my friends Brennan, Matt, and Cody are all some of the best musicians I’ve ever heard and I loved being apart of they’re  world. They made me appreciate the sound and the melody so much more. I could always appreciate the lyrics and understand what the song was about but to be able to feel the bridge and the sound coming  from them. I will forever be grateful to them for that.

I think the reason we listen to what we do generally comes from our parents . I…

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The reason we listen to music

Since I was a kid I have been listening to music. My mom was a musician my brother , my uncle was a brilliant musician and for some reason i could never really grasp the idea of reading and playing music. That’s not to say i didn’t  love it. I love everything about music  but I could never  do it. All of my friends Brennan, Matt, and Cody are all some of the best musicians I’ve ever heard and I loved being apart of they’re  world. They made me appreciate the sound and the melody so much more. I could always appreciate the lyrics and understand what the song was about but to be able to feel the bridge and the sound coming  from them. I will forever be grateful to them for that.

I think the reason we listen to what we do generally comes from our parents . I remember being 5 or 6 and driving with my mom or my step father and listening to old soul and blues. Artists like Otis redding, Marvin Gaye, Buddy Guy, John Lee Hooker and Crosby,Stills,Nash and Young and being so into how the songs made me feel. Now when i hear “teach your children” or “one bourbon one scotch and one one beer ” I am transported back to a time that I felt so calm,so sure of everything and I will neverforget that. It’s the only thing that has the ability to transport me back to another time.

I think one aspect of music that has been lacking for a long time has been soul. If you lok at new R&B it lacks that sound and feel of real feelngs. I think it died with boys 2 men and groups like that. I miss believing what they were saying. I dont get that from R&B artists anymore for the most part. Dont get me wrong we have amazing artists like Anthony Hamilton and Ray lamontagne doing the beautiful lyrical thing. As well as a handfull of other artists that posess the ability to do the real soul but those artists tog get the rcognition they deserve and it’s infuriating. Why would you listen to an Ariana grande album when you can vibe out to jill scott or Erykah Badu  or Listen to Jason Derulo when you can put on Leon Bridges  and Musiq Soulchild. These artists don’t get the recognition they deserve because it’s not necessarily what is getting played in the club. I hate that that’s where music has gone. It’s not about albums anymore it’s about singles. I just want a great album that get’s the recognition it deserves.

D’Angelo put out an album with The Vanguard and it was one of the greatest albums I’ve heard in a long time and it got no hype. Why in the fuck is that? It was so well put together. It was on point musically and D’Angelo’s voice was the perfect contribution to beautifully written music and the whole thing worked so well I couldn’t believe an original album came out that way. I want more of that and less auto tone. I want to feel the soul. I want to be inspired by pain, love,and reality.

I listen to music to get away and be somewhere else. I want to be taken to another place. I want to forget about the real world. I want to be understood. It’s not like I don’t like to dance in the club or even vibe out to some dance beats but it’s not what i would call R&B. I would call it pop music and I think that we are starting to come very close to bringing the two together and that’s not right. It stomps on  the brilliance of Otis redding, James Brown, Ray Charles and Marvin Gaye.

Please bring back real soul and R&B. Keep pop music the way it is but don’t combine the two. It all has it’s place. Don’t take away that beautiful art form that so many musicians bled for and paved the way to be recognized as their  own . Every aspect of music has it’s place, it all belongs and it all gives us as individuals a different perspective. It gives us reason and for that I’m grateful. I just want to keep everything the way it should be.

The Reason

zaneatkin

                    I was 11 years old when I first heard ” The bridge is over” by Boogie Down Productions. It was 10 pm, I was in my bedroom upstairs sitting on in this old brown chair that’s fabric was so worn it felt like burlap, when a friend and his older cousin came in and put on this mix tape they had made and all of a sudden my whole world changed when I heard the deep penetrating sound of KRS One’s voice. ” the bridge is over, the bridge is over BARABBA!” and in a matter of seconds my whole world changed. After that night I was hooked. Hip hop had made its way into my soul and never left.

               Listening and the huge sounds like the Roland 909 on Schooly D’s P.S.K- an echo…

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A Change Has to Come

zaneatkin

In the end of the 70’s there was a buzz shooting through the bronx like a flu epidemic. Heavy percussion mixed with old should hooks all set to poetry. This was the birth of hip-hop, not just a genre but a movement and the creation of a new culture. At that time in the bronx the black community had grown tired of being pushed around and chose to fight back with this new form of expression and they were ready for a fight, a fight that was lasting 12 rounds and stood tall  in the middle of the ring and went blow for blow until it’s musical pedigree prevailed.

I think as a society we look at hip-hop as a negative art form or outlet, just another way for people to put blame on the hate surrounding us and all it’s bullshit. We are a product of our environment and…

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A Change Has to Come

In the end of the 70’s there was a buzz shooting through the bronx like a flu epidemic. Heavy percussion mixed with old should hooks all set to poetry. This was the birth of hip-hop, not just a genre but a movement and the creation of a new culture. At that time in the bronx the black community had grown tired of being pushed around and chose to fight back with this new form of expression and they were ready for a fight, a fight that was lasting 12 rounds and stood tall  in the middle of the ring and went blow for blow until it’s musical pedigree prevailed.

I think as a society we look at hip-hop as a negative art form or outlet, just another way for people to put blame on the hate surrounding us and all it’s bullshit. We are a product of our environment and not the other way around. Hip hop from the way we as a society choose to treat people and continue to define ourselves by class. To truly appreciate this culture you have to understand where it came from. Old soul and blues and various musical outlets that had a message. It needs to come back to its roots. It needs to stand by a message, something to bring change. It has the power to do that and it should take advantage of its ability to get people to listen and make people think. It seems like labels just care about sell,sell,sell!. It has become entirely about money,cars and materialistic bullshit. No political stand point or positive message or outlook. The world is in a state of crisis and instead of creating any sense of unity it pushes us further a part. Creating more hate and more reason to segregate.

When I first heard KRS One, Rakim, 2 Pac, Public Enemy, and Dead Prez I was inspired. I became engulfed in a culture that I would dedicate my life to. It used to be easy for me to defend hip-hop and now it’s becoming ever so difficult or at least for the reasons I fell in love with it. I understand labels trying to turn a profit and make  some quick money but what happened to the art? where did the soul go?. There are still true artists out there but no one gives them the chance or put the time in to make a great album. Just a great single. Thankfully artists like kendrick Lamar and Killer Mike are out there getting a message out. They have a cause. They give people  a reason to act or an opinion. Hip hop is in a dark time and it needs heroes now more than ever. With the heightened sense of awareness pertaining to things like mental illness and domestic abuse. I feel that hip-hop could make a serious contribution to to the change required for these global issues to be fixed. At the same time giving its self a new image and pulling away from the unfortunate stereotypes that follow this genre of music.

This is being written from the stand point of mainstream acknowledgement. There are plenty of great artists out there in every city promoting great messages but they don’t get heard because they don’t sell. there is no gimmick. We need more artists like this on mainstream radio. That way the culture and everything t represents doesn’t die in the shadows of what it used to be. I remember listening to Naz, 2 Pac, The Roots and Wu Tang on top 40 radio. Ya maybe they weren’t the best songs on the album and were produced and released to sell records  but once you heard the the album you were hooked. It made you think. When i first heard ” Brenda’s got a baby” by 2 Pac, I was blown away. That was something that was really happening  in the world I lived in and because that song was played on top 40 radio, it made everyone stop and think about what was going on. People couldn’t deny it. It made everyone aware of what was going on right in their back yard.That is what hip-hop and music is supposed to do.

I understand people want to keep things “underground” to protect their hipster image and not give in to the dreaded national media monster. In order for change to come we need to put it out there. We need to stop worrying about what divides us and focus on change and in order for that to work, it starts with  unity. We need everyone to come together . ” United we stand and divided we fall” which is exactly what will happen to hip-hop and the culture we love so much if we don’t check our ego’s and remember why we fell in love with it in the first place . It will have been all for  nothing. I speak to all the hip-hop fans that truly love this art, this culture and way of life. If we don’t act son it will become lost in translation of pop music and pop  culture.  We will loose a definitive generation .

I love hip-hop and I love music. It’s the one thingI can always count  on.

Written by: Zane Atkin

The Reason

                    I was 11 years old when I first heard ” The bridge is over” by Boogie Down Productions. It was 10 pm, I was in my bedroom upstairs sitting on in this old brown chair that’s fabric was so worn it felt like burlap, when a friend and his older cousin came in and put on this mix tape they had made and all of a sudden my whole world changed when I heard the deep penetrating sound of KRS One’s voice. ” the bridge is over, the bridge is over BARABBA!” and in a matter of seconds my whole world changed. After that night I was hooked. Hip hop had made its way into my soul and never left.

               Listening and the huge sounds like the Roland 909 on Schooly D’s P.S.K- an echo that seemed like it came from a cathedral eight city blocks wide. To be hypnotized by a single sound was incredible. It would take me to a place that I couldn’t be hurt and a place that I was always excepted, a place that was completely my own. The reason I love hip-hop is simple, it gives everything no one thing can. It’s nostalgic . I can hear a track and remember exactly what I was doing or who I was with at that very moment. I’m sure this could be said with any form of music but for me it had to have soul. It had to have anger and just enough rhythem to always bob your head. It was there through break up’s, deaths, Good times and times I thought i would never get over. Wu tang, Naz, 2 Pac, Rakim, Biggie and Mobb Deep were always there. I could always count on one of thier tracks to get me through.

          The greatest hip-hop songs have the power to to pull energy and excitement and anger and questions and self doubt and raw emotions out of you . It could be a song that sets your neighbourhood on fire like “Either” by Naz or a song on your headphones that makes you re think what hip-hop is like “Brenda’s got a Baby” by 2 pac. The common thread is change. The best hip-hop songs aren’t blue prints. They are calls to action. A reminder that you can start a revolution in 3 minutes.

           Some of the most powerful hip-hop songs are tracks with elements so simple your brain would explode trying to explain their logic. Take the unstoppable two tone guitar track in Craig Mack’s ” Flava in your ear”. Or the simple spin off of No Doubts ” Don’t Speak” exploding in an eerie hypnotic circle for the hook on Ice Cubes “War and Peace”.

           Hip Hop is a staple, solidified by its ability to prevail in the worst of times. Just like blues music, it was an outlet for a group of oppressed people who needed a reason. Blues gave them that reason. Just like the people living in the south bronx in the late 70’s and early 80’s, it was a way for them to fight back and face their oppression head on.

     Their isn’t anything else that could take a troubled kid from Windsor Ontario that everyone had already written off and give him the confidence and passion and reason to stand up and fight for what he wanted. So for that, I speak on anyone’s behalf that has ever sat in their bed room or hung out in their basements listening to the smooth melodic bass lines of Naz’s  Illmatic or the hard hitting throw back hook’s on Wu Tang’s 36 chambers,  when I say thank you hip-howe are forever in your debt.